Category Archives: D-Day

Covering the Day of Days

Seventy-seven years after Allied troops landed in Normandy, we run through the timeline of how D-Day news coverage unfolded on June 6, 1944.

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D-Day: Behind enemy lines with a typewriter

Paratroopers from the 82nd and 101st Airborne divisions jumped with 125 to 150 pounds of equipment on D-Day, loaded down with whatever they might need to be self-sufficient until the linkup with seaborne troops or aerial resupply arrived. Time correspondent William Walton didn’t jump with a radio or machine gun components like some of his compatriots, but he did strap

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D-Day: Joan Ellis and the AP’s accidental invasion report

The flash hit the Associated Press wire at 4:39 p.m. Eastern War Time on Saturday, June 3, 1944: FLASH LONDON EISENHOWER’S HEADQUARTERS ANNOUNCED ALLIED LANDINGS IN FRANCE U.S. broadcast news operations had been poised for just such an alert for weeks, and immediately sprang into action. Seconds after the flash hit the wire, CBS broke into the Belmont Stakes broadcast

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D-Day: Correspondents balance ambition, fear ahead of invasion

The classic bit that sums up the tension between the press and its handlers ahead of the Normandy Invasion first appeared in Leonard Lyons’ syndicated column on June 12, 1944: Shortly before the invasion began, Britain’s Ministry of Information was besieged by hundreds of newspapermen seeking credentials to cover the story. For a while the confusion seemed interminable. One disgruntled

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